MEPI: Combating Corruption in Jordan (2014)

The Vision Center for Strategic and Development Studies conducted a series of workshops on how to combat corruption in Jordan together with Middle East Partnership Initiative (MEPI) from February to May 2014.

 

The first workshop, titled “Concept of Corruption” took place over the course of two days. On the first day of the workshop they covered different types of corruption both in Jordan and internationally. The course materials for the first day included articles, opinions and Jordanian (and international) legislation/regulations defining types of corruption in Jordan (and elsewhere). On the second day of the workshop they covered different legal instruments in both Jordan and internationally. The course materials for the second day included articles, opinions, Jordanian (and international) legislation/regulations reflecting the available instruments to combat corruption in Jordan (and elsewhere). On both days specialized Jordanian guest speakers, such as representatives from the JACC and NIC, addressed the issues at stake.

 

The second workshop, titled “Public Sector Corruption” took place over the course of two days. On Day One forms of corruption related to the public sector were discussed, and the course materials for the day included articles, opinions and Jordanian (and international, if relevant/instructive) legislation/regulations discussing corruption specifically in the public sector in Jordan (and elsewhere). On Day Two remedies against public sector corruption in Jordan (and elsewhere) were discussed, and the course materials for the day included articles, opinions, Jordanian (and international) legislation/regulations reflecting the available instruments to combat corruption specifically in relation to the public sector in Jordan (and elsewhere). On both days specialized Jordanian guest speakers, from the Audit Bureau, the Ministry of Finance, the Central bank of Jordan or the General Attorney’s office: Ministry of Justice, addressed the issues at stake.

 

The third workshop, titled “Private Sector Corruption” took place over the course of two days. On the first day forms of corruption related to the private sector in Jordan (and elsewhere) were discussed. The course materials for the first day included articles, opinions and Jordanian (and international) legislation/regulations discussing corruption specifically in the private sector in Jordan (and elsewhere). On the second day remedies for the Private sector corruption (and elsewhere) were discussed, and the course work included articles, opinions, Jordanian (and international) legislation/regulations reflecting the available instruments to combat corruption specifically in relation to the private sector in Jordan (and elsewhere). On both days specialized Jordanian guest speakers, from the Company Control Department at the Ministry of Industry & Trade, the Jordan Chamber of Commerce and related business associations (not just from Amman but also elsewhere) or Jordanian entrepreneurs of excellent reputation, addressed the issues at stake.

 

The fourth workshop, titled “Civil Society, Media and Corruption” took place over the course of two days. On the first day forms of corruption related to Civil Society and the Media were discussed from course materials including articles, opinions and Jordanian (and international) legislation/regulations discussing corruption specifically in Civil Society and the Media in Jordan (and elsewhere). On the second day remedies for corruption in Civil Society and the Media were discussed using course materials including articles, opinions, Jordanian (and international) legislation/regulations reflecting the available instruments to combat corruption specifically in relation to Civil Society and the Media in Jordan (and elsewhere). On both days specialized Jordanian guest speakers, including from the Ministry of Information and Communications Technology, leading figures in the Jordanian Media such as the editor-in-chief of al-Ghad newspaper, the Jordanian Parliament, social media/bloggers, the Audio-vision Commission, Journalist Syndicate, certified PIE NGO’s or the Ministry of Social Development, addressed the issues at stake.

 

The fifth workshop, titled “Relationship between corruption, Rule of Law and Good Governance” took place over the course of two days. On the first day concepts of Rule of Law and Good Governance, their codification and implementation in Jordan (and elsewhere) were discussed. The course materials for that day included articles, opinions and Jordanian (and international) legislation/regulations establishing Rule of Law and Good Governance in Jordan (and elsewhere). On the second day the importance of accountability (public and private) and checks and balances were discussed using course material including articles, opinions, Jordanian (and international) legislation/regulations reflecting the importance of Rule of Law and Good Governance in combating corruption by creating and maintaining checks and balances. On both days specialized Jordanian guest speakers addressed the issues at stake including from the Judicial Council or at least the Judiciary, the Jordanian Parliament, Jordanian lawyers in private practice of excellent reputation, academics specialized in law, the Ministry of Justice, the Ministry of Social Development. NIC or ACC topics included the content, implementation and usefulness of legislative and other legal reform, Codes of Conduct, access to information legislation, the role of independent legal Institutions and professions in avoiding or combating corruption, the importance of proper administration in avoiding or combating corruption – all of which from an activist perspective.

 

The sixth and final workshop, titled “NGO’s Strategies and Initiatives in Combatting Corruption” took place over the course of two days. On the first day speakers presented and discussion took place on the role of CSOs, the investment sector, the media, and the legislature in combating corruption. On the second day the NGOs presented and discussed their initiatives for fighting corruption within its various forms. The initiatives reflected direct actions being taken by the NGOs participating, not just theoretical actions or ideas.

 

Evaluations of each workshop were conducted by pre and post tests to evaluate the project participants, where the results show the level of change in the participants knowledge.

© 2008-2018 Jordan Visions Center for Stratigic and Development Studies

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